What are Ancient Pre-Christian myths and Sacred Lore really derived from? — The Germanic/Teutonic Center of Northern Cultural Arts

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For the serious seeker of Indo-European spiritual practices, within the pursuit of searching out anthropology based historical accuracy required to fill in some of the gaps behind them; one can began to assuredly start heading down a seemingly wide open road on a subject topic, only to quickly hit a blind turn, some gravel, and […]

über What are Ancient Pre-Christian myths and Sacred Lore really derived from? — The Germanic/Teutonic Center of Northern Cultural Arts

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Electricity in the Ancient World

Gates of Nineveh: An Experiment in Blogging Assyriology

Electricity in the ancient world? The idea that generating electricity is a relatively recent invention is taken for granted almost as much as our modern society’s total dependence on it. While lightning, magnetism and static electricity were known in the ancient world, they were not utilized in any way nor was it understood that the phenomena were related. They were curiosities, interesting anomalies to ponder over, sometimes destructive, but not useful.

Yet, we have evidence that in the 1st century AD one ancient culture not only recognized electricity, but harnessed it and learned how to generate it. Yet, this was not done by the Romans, Greeks or Chinese, generally considered the most technologically advanced of ancient civilizations. Instead, this was accomplished in the Parthian Empire, not especially noted for its engineering or technical prowess.

In 1936, archaeologists working for the Iraqi Antiquities Authority were excavating the Parthian site of Khujut…

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The Trojan War in Greek Historical Sources

Gates of Nineveh: An Experiment in Blogging Assyriology

The first modern ancient historians often took a harshly critical view of Homer. By the beginning of the modern era, western scholars generally held that the Iliad and Odyssey were myth, that the Trojan war was not an actual event and that the characters of Homer’s poems were not real people. Blaise Pascal wrote in Pensées that Homer „did not think of making a history, but solely a book to amuse; he is the only writer of his time; the beauty of the work has made it last.“ He went on to write that „Every history which is not contemporaneous…[is] false, and found to be false in the course of time. It is not so with contemporaneous writers,“[1] which, if taken literally, would mean that this website is in fact a web of falsehood and the practice of studying history should cease. In his massive 11-volume History of Greece (published…

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