Things to see and do in Sparta — Gruntie’s Travels

The ancient Spartans were fighters, not builders, so there is not a great deal of substantial evidence of them in their prime around 400BC. But there are some remains to explore as well as the small Archeology Museum and The Olive Oil Museum. Sparta also has a smattering of churches that are worth visiting. The […]

Things to see and do in Sparta — Gruntie’s Travels

Ephesus: Marvel of the ancient world in western Turkey; Daily Sabah — All About World Heritage Sites

Source: Ephesus: Marvel of the ancient world in western Turkey

Ephesus: Marvel of the ancient world in western Turkey; Daily Sabah — All About World Heritage Sites

The Human Story – The European Renaissance — Rest is History

The Renaissance was an eventful period of European cultural, political, artistic and economic “rebirth” following the miserable Middle Ages. Generally, described as taking place from the 14th to 17th centuries, the European Renaissance promoted the rediscovery of classical philosophy, art and literature. Some of the greatest authors, statesman, thinkers and scientists in human history lived […]

The Human Story – The European Renaissance — Rest is History

Greek Philosophy – Aristotle’s Ethics — Thought Itself

Aristotle believed that humans have a purpose which is the fulfillment of human nature, the aim of the good life.  While many goals in life merely lead to further additional goals, such as the goal of making money leading to the goal of pleasure or security, Aristotle that there must be a final goal, an […]

Greek Philosophy – Aristotle’s Ethics — Thought Itself

Why We Need the Classics — Discourses on Minerva

Do the ancient Greeks have anything left to tell us? Anyone who deals extensively in the humanities, and especially the classics, inevitably must ask themselves this question. Apart from being eclectic or a renaissance individual, if the Greeks have nothing important to teach us, why bother wrestling with them at all? That seems to be […]

Why We Need the Classics — Discourses on Minerva

Study Shows Ancient Theatre Of Epidaurus Is World’s Most Perfect In Terms Of Aesthetics And Acoustics; Paulina Karavasili; Greek City Times — All About World Heritage Sites

The Ancient Theatre of Epidaurus is an acoustic and aesthetic marvel, and all the more wondrous considering that it was created almost 2,500 years ago. Source: Study Shows Ancient Theatre Of Epidaurus Is World’s Most Perfect In Terms Of Aesthetics And Acoustics – Greek City Times

Study Shows Ancient Theatre Of Epidaurus Is World’s Most Perfect In Terms Of Aesthetics And Acoustics; Paulina Karavasili; Greek City Times — All About World Heritage Sites

Prometheus

Friday, 30 October 2020

Eurasian mythologies all contain myths about the invention of plough, oxen cart, potter’s wheel, weaving loom, metal, writing…

In the myths they were either invented by gods and then given to heroes who gave them to people, invented by gods and then stolen by heroes who gave them to people or invented by heroes who gave them to people…

In reality, based on the archaeological records, these are all things invented during neolithic – chalcolithic – bronze age period…

Why were the inventions of these, from our point of view, „ordinary things“, attributed to mythical beings?

Because, from the point of view of the people who made the myths,  each one of these things was so mind blowing, so incredibly impossible to be invented by an ordinary human, that it had to have been invented by some superhuman, a hero or a god…

So why is the invention of fire making among these things? Archaeologist believe that making of fire was invented by primitive humans. If so, it had been known for, eeeee, hundreds of thousands of years, and was a common knowledge by the time the Eurasian myths were made…

So why do we have the myth of Prometheus? Prometheus who „stole fire from the thunder god Zeus“ and gave it to people. Remember, originally, before the invention of the fire drill, only thunder gods could make fire. Using lightning.    People had to „find fire“ and „steal it“…

read more: http://oldeuropeanculture.blogspot.com/2020/10/prometheus.html