21 April AD 121 – Hadrian celebrates Rome’s 874th birthday with circus games (#Hadrian1900) — FOLLOWING HADRIAN

Every year, the Romans celebrated the birthday of their city on the 21st of April, the day on which, according to early traditions, Romulus founded Rome by tracing the pomerium, the sacred urban boundary separating the city (urbs) from the country (ager). The celebrations were held during the Parilia, a rural festival associated with flocks and……

21 April AD 121 – Hadrian celebrates Rome’s 874th birthday with circus games (#Hadrian1900) — FOLLOWING HADRIAN

18 February AD 121 – Titus Haterius Nepos, prefect of Egypt, visits the Memnon Colossus (#Hadrian1900) — FOLLOWING HADRIAN

On this day, one thousand nine hundred years ago, Titus Haterius Nepos, the prefect of Egypt, visited the Colossus of Memnon at the Theban necropolis and heard the statue sing. Nepos immortalised his encounter by inscribing his name upon the right leg of the statue. In a five-line text written in Latin, Nepos attests that……

18 February AD 121 – Titus Haterius Nepos, prefect of Egypt, visits the Memnon Colossus (#Hadrian1900) — FOLLOWING HADRIAN

Qasr al-Abd — following hadrian photography

Qasr al-Abd is a rare example of Hellenistic architecture located in Iraq al-Amir in the Jordan Valley, 17 kilometres west of Amman. The building was erected in the 2nd century BC by Hyrcanus, son of the tax collector Joseph of Jerusalem from the influential Tobiads Jewish family. Qasr al-Abd (Castle of the Slave) is thought […]

Qasr al-Abd — following hadrian photography

Hadrian in colour, by Danila Loginov — FOLLOWING HADRIAN

Antiquity was a very colourful place! The myth of all-white marble classical sculpture that remained uninterrupted for centuries has been put to rest thanks to modern science. Over the past thirty years or so, ground-breaking research in pigmentation have revealed new evidence for painted and ornamented surfaces on classical sculpture. Modern techniques such as X-ray……

Hadrian in colour, by Danila Loginov — FOLLOWING HADRIAN

AD 120 – The army erects a wooden palisade on the German frontier (#Hadrian1900) — FOLLOWING HADRIAN

Hadrian’s deep concern with consolidating and defining the Empire started very early in his reign. Upon ascending the throne, the new emperor abandoned Trajan’s newly conquered provinces beyond the Euphrates and rapidly took the opportunity to carry out his new frontier policy. He first embarked on a quick inspection of the military bases along the……

AD 120 – The army erects a wooden palisade on the German frontier (#Hadrian1900) — FOLLOWING HADRIAN

Thugga (Dougga) — following hadrian photography

The archaeological site of Thugga (modern-day Dougga) is located in the North-west region of Tunisia, dominating the fertile valley of Oued Khalled. Before the Roman annexation of Numidia, the town of Thugga was the capital of an important Libyco-Punic state. It flourished under Roman rule but declined during the Byzantine and Islamic periods. The impressive […]

Thugga (Dougga) — following hadrian photography

Philae — following hadrian photography

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The original island of Philae was the site of an Egyptian temple complex in the Nile that now lies submerged beneath the waters of Lake Nasser to the south of Aswan in southern Egypt. It was originally located near the First Cataract of the Nile in Upper Egypt but was dismantled and moved to nearby […]

über Philae — following hadrian photography

Buthrotum (Butrint) — following hadrian photography

Zitat

As Albanian’s first designated UNESCO World Heritage Site, Butrint (ancient Buthrotum) is the most famous and most visited archaeological site in the country. Located in southern Albania directly opposite the Greek island of Corfu, Butrint offers a combination of historic ruins and natural beauty. Its well-preserved ruins are nestled in a marshy landscape between an […]

über Buthrotum (Butrint) — following hadrian photography

Guest post: ‘Always in all things changeable’: The emperor and his tomb — FOLLOWING HADRIAN

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An essay by Nick Leonard… The emperor of Rome, ‘god and Panhellene,’1 was not one to linger anywhere, and certainly not in the capital city that he despised. All the major hallmarks of Hadrian’s reign – his civic architectural projects, his defensive fortifications, his drilling of the legions – stemmed from a restlessness that compelled […]

über Guest post: ‘Always in all things changeable’: The emperor and his tomb — FOLLOWING HADRIAN