INDIA – EMPIRE OF THE SPIRIT — naturetails

„The morning light has flooded my eyes – this is Your message to my heart. Your face is bent from above, Your eyes look down on my eyes, and my heart has touched Your feet.“ . […]

INDIA – EMPIRE OF THE SPIRIT — naturetails

Rome’s Commerce with India – Travel between Italy and the Near East — Novo Scriptorium

The first two centuries of the Roman Empire witnessed the establishment and development of a profitable commerce between two great regions of the earth, the Mediterranean countries and India. We need not wonder at this. In the first place, the century after Christ was an era of new discoveries and enterprises, for the western world, […]

Rome’s Commerce with India – Travel between Italy and the Near East — Novo Scriptorium

Ganesha

Thursday, 26 November 2020

Ganesha, the god with an elephant head, is one of the best-known and most worshipped deities in the Hindu pantheon. He is revered as the god of beginnings, the remover of obstacles and the patron of arts and sciences and the god of intellect and wisdom. I talked about the reason why in my post „Elephant memory„.

Ganesha may have emerged as a deity as early as the 1st century BCE, but most certainly by the 4th and 5th centuries CE, during the Gupta period…

There are many legends abut Ganesha. But interestingly, most of these stories concentrate on three things: his birth, his elephant head, and his single tusk.

In this article I would like to talk about these legends and would try to extract from them data that will help us to understand who this god really is…

While Ganesha is popularly considered to be the son of Shiva and Parvati, the Puranic myths relate several different versions of his birth. These include versions in which he is created by Shiva, by Parvati, by Shiva and Parvati, or in some other manner and is later discovered by Shiva and Parvati.

The most well-known Ganesha creation story is probably the one taken from the Shiva Purana.

The goddess Parvati had started preparing for a bath. As she didn’t want to be disturbed during her bath and since Nandi (Bull servant of Shiva) was not at Kailash to keep guard of the door, Parvati took the turmeric paste (for bathing) from her body and made a form of a boy and breathed life into him. This boy was instructed by Parvati to guard the door and to not let anyone in until she finished her bath.

After Shiva had come out of his meditation, he wanted to go and see Parvati but found himself being stopped by this strange boy. Shiva tried to reason with the boy saying that he was Parvati’s husband but the boy did not listen and was determined to not let Shiva enter until his mother Parvati finished her bath. The „usually peaceful“ Shiva who was „desperate“ to „see“ Parvati got so mad with the boy that his „divine fury“ severed the boy’s head with his Trishul thereby killing him instantly.

read more: http://oldeuropeanculture.blogspot.com/2020/11/ganesha.html

Greek influence on Indian culture in Antiquity — Novo Scriptorium

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The advent of Greeks in India dates back from 6th century (BC) to 5th century (AD) as an outcome of Greek expedition towards Persia.

über Greek influence on Indian culture in Antiquity — Novo Scriptorium

ART OF MEDIEVAL INDIA – The temples with pyramidal roof — ArS Artistic Adventure of Mankind

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Parallel to the temples with shikhara and the architectural types developed in the North of India in the South a series of temples with pyramidal roof were developed during the same period whose process of evolution is analogous to that of the temples with a curvilinear roof but which presented even more numerous variants. We must […]

über ART OF MEDIEVAL INDIA – The temples with pyramidal roof — ArS Artistic Adventure of Mankind

Ancient Temples: Gods in the Cloud — Sandeep Bhalla’s Blog

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Ancient Religious Temples of Gods in India. Ancient Temples in India: While Civilization of India archaeologically dates back to 4000 BC, there is nothing functional from that date. This prompted me to search for functional ancient temples in India. Most of the temples are also a tourist attraction and most are in the cloud through its web sites. The curiosity has […]

über Ancient Temples: Gods in the Cloud — Sandeep Bhalla’s Blog

ART OF MEDIEVAL INDIA – The Temples with Curvilinear Roof — ArS Artistic Adventure of Mankind

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The temples with curvilinear roof (shikhara) appeared towards the 8th century (e.g. the brick sanctuary of Lakshmana in Sarpur (Rajasthan), and the temples of Papanatha and Jambulinga). From the beginning of the ninth century, the use of these curvilinear roofs extended to the northern kingdoms, where its use was perpetuated until the contemporary era, at […]

über ART OF MEDIEVAL INDIA – The Temples with Curvilinear Roof — ArS Artistic Adventure of Mankind