Butt chewing

Friday, 7 May 2021

„Triumphant bull with flowing beard climbing the mountain“? It’s from the time of the First Dynasty of Ur…No one knows what it means because: „we have no written documents explaining it“…At least this is what we can read in „A Problem of Early Sumerian Art

Let’s see if we can come out with some sensible explanation for this scene…“Enki placed in charge of the whole of heaven and earth the hero, the youth Utu (Shamash), the bull standing triumphantly, audaciously, majestically…the great herald in the east of holy An…with a lapis-lazuli beard, rising from the horizon…“ from „Enki and the world order„…Here’s the majestic Shamash, depicted as a golden bull with long flowing „lapis lazuli“ beard…

Why? To understand this we need to know something about the source of water in Tigris and Euphrates…Well according to the Sumerian legends, the source of these two rivers is Enki.
In „Enki and the world order“ we read: „…Father Enki…he stood up full of lust like a rampant bull, lifted his penis, ejaculated and filled the Tigris with flowing water [after filling Euphrates]. He was like a wild cow mooing for its young in the wild grass…“
But the actual source of water in the two sacred rivers was to a smaller extent rain which fell during the wet half of the year (Oct/Nov-Apr/May), but majority of water in Tigris and Euphrates came from the snow melt in Anatolian highlands and Iranian Zagros mountains…
This snowmelt is caused by Young (spring) sun, Young Shamash…Here he is depicted on this seal in a short tunic climbing the sacred mountain towards Imprisoned Enki…To free him…

rhttp://oldeuropeanculture.blogspot.com/2021/05/butt-chewing.htmlead more:

Pan – Goat of rain

Saturday, 12 December 2020

Pan is a great example of what happens when mythology based on a local climate gets exported to the place where climate is different…

The story of Pan starts on the Island of Crete, where the local climate is characterised by hot, dry summers and mild, rainy winters. The rainy season starts in October and lasts till March or even April.

The beginning of the Cretan rain season coincides with the beginning of the mating season of the Cretan Ibex.

Which is why in Minoan Crete Ibex was venerated as the goat which brought rain…And life… Which is why Ibexes are depicted on this Minoan fresco from Knossos flanking „the tree of life“…

By the way, the „tree of life“ is olive. And olives are harvested from late October, early November, at the beginning of the rain season…

The flowers depicted all around are crocuses, which also bloom from Late October, early November, at the beginning of the rain season…

 

So this fresco depicts the beginning of the rain season, when ibexes fight and mate, crocuses bloom and olives are ripe…

We know that the Ibex cult existed in Mycenae, to where it was most likely brought from Minoan Crete. We can see this from seals found in Mycenaean sites.

 

read more: http://oldeuropeanculture.blogspot.com/2020/12/pan-goat-or-rain.html

 

Ganesha

Thursday, 26 November 2020

Ganesha, the god with an elephant head, is one of the best-known and most worshipped deities in the Hindu pantheon. He is revered as the god of beginnings, the remover of obstacles and the patron of arts and sciences and the god of intellect and wisdom. I talked about the reason why in my post „Elephant memory„.

Ganesha may have emerged as a deity as early as the 1st century BCE, but most certainly by the 4th and 5th centuries CE, during the Gupta period…

There are many legends abut Ganesha. But interestingly, most of these stories concentrate on three things: his birth, his elephant head, and his single tusk.

In this article I would like to talk about these legends and would try to extract from them data that will help us to understand who this god really is…

While Ganesha is popularly considered to be the son of Shiva and Parvati, the Puranic myths relate several different versions of his birth. These include versions in which he is created by Shiva, by Parvati, by Shiva and Parvati, or in some other manner and is later discovered by Shiva and Parvati.

The most well-known Ganesha creation story is probably the one taken from the Shiva Purana.

The goddess Parvati had started preparing for a bath. As she didn’t want to be disturbed during her bath and since Nandi (Bull servant of Shiva) was not at Kailash to keep guard of the door, Parvati took the turmeric paste (for bathing) from her body and made a form of a boy and breathed life into him. This boy was instructed by Parvati to guard the door and to not let anyone in until she finished her bath.

After Shiva had come out of his meditation, he wanted to go and see Parvati but found himself being stopped by this strange boy. Shiva tried to reason with the boy saying that he was Parvati’s husband but the boy did not listen and was determined to not let Shiva enter until his mother Parvati finished her bath. The „usually peaceful“ Shiva who was „desperate“ to „see“ Parvati got so mad with the boy that his „divine fury“ severed the boy’s head with his Trishul thereby killing him instantly.

read more: http://oldeuropeanculture.blogspot.com/2020/11/ganesha.html

Calydonian boar

riday, 25 September 2020

Illyrian silver stater 300-275 BC. Cow suckling her calf. Jawbone above. So what’s the meaning of all of this?

 

Of first the cow suckling the calf.

The calving season of the wild Eurasian cattle starts in Taurus, beginning of summer. This is also the beginning of the milking season…I wrote about the link between wild Eurasian cattle and Taurus in my article „Ram and Bull“ and about bull as the symbol of summer in my article „Symbols of the seasons„…

Now we have to identify the jawbone. Officially this is a wild boar jawbone…Is it?

Jawbone from the coin.

Earth’s Ice Ages — Andy May Petrophysicist

By Andy May The phrase „Ice Age“ is poorly defined and often abused, so let’s first define the climate state during most ice ages. It is called „Icehouse Earth.“ The earth is in an icehouse state when either or both poles are covered in a thick, permanent icecap (Scotese 2015). Today, both poles are covered […]

Earth’s Ice Ages — Andy May Petrophysicist

Seven headed dragon

Saturday, 25 July 2020

This is a seal from Tell Asmar, dated to 2200 BC. It depicts a seven headed dragon (beast with lion’s body and seven snake heads) with sun’s heat rays radiating out of its back, being speared by two gods (heroes)…
 
 
As Gary A. Rendsburg points out in his article „UT 68 and the Tell Asmar Seal“ this is one of the most remarkable seals ever found and one of the most discussed…
 
Why? Because the mythical theme of a hero (god) slaying 7 headed dragon keeps popping up again and again in different cultures in Eurasia…
 
For instance the Ugaritic monster Lotan (meaning „coiled“), also called „the mighty one with seven heads“, was a serpent of the sea god Yam. Or Yam himself as he was also called „the serpent“. This monster was defeated by the storm god Hadad-Baʿal in the Ugaritic Baal Cycle…
 
Hadad defeating Lotan, Yahweh defeating Leviathan, Marduk defeating Tiamat, Zeus slaying Typhon, Heracles slaying Hidra, Perun killing Veles, Thor fighting Jörmungandr…Different versions of the same myth which originated most likely in the Fertile Crescent among the Neolithic farmers…
 
This story is allegorical description of the local Mesopotamian climate, where the year is divided into two seasons: dry, hot summer (Apr/May-Oct/Nov) and wet, cool winter (Oct/Nov-Apr/May)…