Tanngnjostr and Tanngrisnir

Sunday, 17 January 2021

One of the versions of the Scandinavian Yule Goat has long sharp teeth…

Meet Tanngnjostr and Tanngrisnir, the magic goats of Thor…They are the guys that pull his chariot…

Have you ever thought why a thunder god would travel in a chariot pulled by goats? I did…I puzzled and puzzled until my puzzler was sore…Then I presented the result of my puzzling 🙂 in my post „Goat riding thunder gods„…

Now as you can imagine, Thor’s goat were not ordinary goats…No god would ride on a chariot pulled by ordinary goats…

First, they have teeth like carnivores and they eat raw meat…

Also they are immortal. As described in this story:

Once Thor travelled together with Loki. When evening came, they sought cover in a farmhouse. Thor then killed his goats with his hammer, Mjolnir, and skinned them, roasted them and everyone ate the meat…

But, he said, nobody must break any of the bones to suck the delicious marrow. 

But Thialfi, the farmer’s son, broke one of the bones, because the marrow inside the bones tastes by far the best.

Next morning Thor spread the two skins on the ground and laid all the bones on them. Then he swung his hammer, Mjolnir, and the skins and bones moved around until suddenly the two goats stood whole and completely alive again, ready to drive on…

But one of them had a bad leg! Thor got really angry, and Thialfi had to admit what he had done. As punishment Thialfi had to come with Thor as a servant…

And this is why one of Thor’s goats is lame…

Sounds familiar? The goat that gets killed and then resurrects? I talked about the goats that get killed and then get resurrected during European winter rituals in my article „Krampus„…

The goats whose death and resurrection symbolizes the end of winter and the beginning of spring…The death of winter earth and birth of spring earth. Otherwise known as resurrection of nature… 

But what about the goats with teeth? What’s that about? Well there is a very strange fairy tale found in Serbia, Germany and Italy…It’s about a goat…A very annoying goat. 

 

read more: http://oldeuropeanculture.blogspot.com/2021/01/tanngnjostr-and-tanngrisnir.html

 

 

 

 

 

 

Frigg, Queen and Mother — We Are Star Stuff

Zitat

This is the first of a series of posts on Frigg, the wife of Odin and the mother of Baldr. Unlike her husband, she plays very little part in the tales, and unlike Freyja no Eddic poem commemorates her deeds. Later medieval writers made Frigg and Odin into a kind of northern Jupiter and Juno […]

über Frigg, Queen and Mother — We Are Star Stuff

The Norse Legend of the World Tree – Yggdrasil

Mythological Yggdrasil

In 1643 a Bishop called Brynjolf Sveinsson was given forty- five pieces of vellum containing poetry and prose from the heart of ancient Northern European indigenous culture. This collection is called The King’s Book (the Codex Regius in Latin). It is thought to have been written around 1270. Between 1270 and 1643 the manuscript was hidden from public view, presumably to protect it from being destroyed by the new religion which arose from Rome. Who the family was that protected this manuscript for over three hundred years we don’t know, and nor do we know their tradition, but we can be sure that it would have been a treacherous secret to bear safely through the medieval centuries. The Bishop did not himself keep the manuscript; instead, he offered the collection as a gift to the King of Denmark. There it remained in Copenhagen until 1971, when it was returned to Iceland.

Codex Regius (The King's book) of Eddaic Poems and Flateyjarbok

Codex Regius (The King’s book) of Eddaic Poems and Flateyjarbok ( Wikimedia Commons )

Warships had to transport the manuscript across the sea, as a plane journey was seen as too risky – such was the preciousness of the papers. It is not surprising: these vellum papers represent the few written remains of our indigenous past of Northern Europe.

When we open these old scripts we find at the heart of the Norse mythology contained within a symbol as archaic as campfire: the World Tree, Yggdrasil.

I know that an ash-tree stands called Yggdrasil,
a high tree, soaked with shining loam;
from there comes the dews which fall in the valley, ever green, it stands over the well of fate.
(Seeress’s Prophecy)

The most satisfactory translation of the name Yggdrasil is ‘Odin’s Horse’. Ygg is another name for Odin, and drasill means ‘horse’. However, drasill also means ‘walker’, or ‘pioneer’. Some scholars would argue that the name means ‘Odinwalker’. In some parts of the manuscript, Yggdrasil and Odin seem to be one and the same.

read more: http://www.ancient-origins.net/myths-legends-europe/norse-legend-world-tree-yggdrasil-002680

Das Pantheon der Wikinger

Originally posted on MORGENWACHT: Von Rudolf Simek, erschienen im Ausstellungskatalog zur Ausstellung „Die Wikinger“ in der Kunsthalle Leoben 2008; ISBN 987-3-9500840-4-0. „Alle im Kampf auf dem Schlachtfeld gefallenen Krieger seit Anbeginn der Welt kommen nach Walhall zu Odin. Dort ist daher eine riesige Menschenmenge, aber für alle ist genug Fleisch vom Eber Saehrimnir da, der…

über Die Mythologie und Religion der Wikingerzeit — Treue und Ehre