The faceless one

Thursday, 9 January 2020

Kostenki is a very important cluster of Paleolithic sites on the Don River in Russia. Dated to after 25 000 BP, these were settlements of mammoth hunters who lived in dwellings made of mammoth bones…

And they loved making „Venus“ figurines from mammoth ivory…

The figurines bodies are all anatomically perfect and different, definitely modelled on real probably pregnant women from the community. But they are all the same in one respect: they are all faceless…

In my recent article about faceless „Palaeolithic venus figurines“ from Europe I argued that these figurines were deliberately made faceless to emphasise the they were symbols of fertility, of fertile earth, Mother Earth, and not depiction of real women…

I concluded that this was a proof that Palaeolithic people were able to invent, transmit and understand complex symbols and their meanings…

Then someone replied that I was wrong, and that most likely the reason for making these figurines faceless was that there was a taboo on depicting human faces. Considering that we have lots of depictions of anatomically perfect animal faces.

When I replied that we have found both faceless figurines and figurines with perfectly depicted human faces (both male and female) on same archaeological sites, the same person replied that maybe there was a taboo on depicting only the face of the goddess…

read more in:http://oldeuropeanculture.blogspot.com/

How we got bigger, more vulnerable brains — More Than A Dodo

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This article is taken from European research magazine Horizon as part of our partnership to share natural environment science stories with readers of More than a Dodo. For more on the development of the brain see our Brain Diaries exhibition site. One of the major features that distinguishes humans from other primates is the size of our […]

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