The Rock of St Peter — RemnantDisciplesJtM

The Chair of Rock Posted on February 22, 2021 by Mark ON THE FEAST OF THE CHAIR OF ST. PETER THE APOSTLE I was passing through a trade fair when I came across a “Christian Cowboy” booth. Sitting on a ledge were a stack of NIV bibles with a snapshot of horses on the cover. I […]

The Rock of St Peter — RemnantDisciplesJtM

Werewolf Week In Rome: Don’t Look a Wolf in the Eyes! — SENTENTIAE ANTIQUAE

Here is the rather famous account of Werewolves from Pliny the Elder’s Natural History 8.34) (for the full text: see Perseus). The Latin text on Perseus is incorrect, but fortunately Lacus Curtius is there to save the day. Pliny, NH 8.34 80-83 “But in Italy they also believe that the gaze of a wolf is harmful—specifically that it will…

Werewolf Week In Rome: Don’t Look a Wolf in the Eyes! — SENTENTIAE ANTIQUAE

Romulus’ Choice: Astronomy or Conquest — SENTENTIAE ANTIQUAE

Ovid, Fasti 1.28-44 When the founder of the city was straightening out the calendar, he decreed that there be twice five months in the year. Ah Romulus, you knew arms a bit better than you knew the stars, and perhaps took greater care to conquer your neighbors. Yet, Caesar, there is a reason which moved…

Romulus’ Choice: Astronomy or Conquest — SENTENTIAE ANTIQUAE

21 April AD 121 – Hadrian celebrates Rome’s 874th birthday with circus games (#Hadrian1900) — FOLLOWING HADRIAN

Every year, the Romans celebrated the birthday of their city on the 21st of April, the day on which, according to early traditions, Romulus founded Rome by tracing the pomerium, the sacred urban boundary separating the city (urbs) from the country (ager). The celebrations were held during the Parilia, a rural festival associated with flocks and……

21 April AD 121 – Hadrian celebrates Rome’s 874th birthday with circus games (#Hadrian1900) — FOLLOWING HADRIAN

Happy Birthday Rome–You Were Almost Remora! — SENTENTIAE ANTIQUAE

This passage from Ennius is preserved in Cicero’s De Divinatione 1.48 “They were struggling over whether the city would be called Roma or Remora. And worry about which one of them would rule infected all men. They were awaiting the word as when the consul wishes to give the signal And all men eagerly look…

Happy Birthday Rome–You Were Almost Remora! — SENTENTIAE ANTIQUAE

The Colosseum: A Political Tool — History in Politics

Arguably the most iconic arena in the world, Il Colosseo still stands at the very centre of modern Rome as a testament to both the glory and the cruelty of the Roman Empire. Constructed almost two thousand years ago, around six million people still flock to Italy’s capital to explore the history and grandeur of […]

The Colosseum: A Political Tool — History in Politics

Napoleon’s vision for a new imperial Rome — Delving into History ® _ periklis deligiannis

Republication from  thehistoryblog.com Napoleon’s forces occupied Rome twice. The first time was in February 1798 when General Louis Alexandre Berthier invaded the Papal States and Rome, for the first time since antiquity, was declared a republic, one of multiple “sister republics” established by Revolutionary France under the aegis of the Directory. The republic lasted barely […]

Napoleon’s vision for a new imperial Rome — Delving into History ® _ periklis deligiannis

Woman as symbol: early Rome. — CL 206 — women in antiquity — Spring 2020

Identifications — Etruscan women — Ilia/Rhea Silvia — Sabine Women — Lucretia 1. The Etruscans. Map: wikimedia.   “Historically, the Etruscans were the people who inhabited the roughly triangular region on the west coast of Italy bounded by the rivers Tiber and Arno. Although they apparently called themselves ‘Rasenna’ (Dionysius of Halicarnassus 1.30.3), they were known to the Romans as Etrusci […]

Woman as symbol: early Rome. — CL 206 — women in antiquity — Spring 2020

The Ostrogothic Conquest of Italy — Novo Scriptorium

After the overthrow of the Hunnic Empire on the field of Nadao in A.D. 454 the Ostrogoths, who had been one of the chief members of that Empire, settled in Pannonia. Now for the first time they settled on the inner side of the Roman frontier. The settlement was made by agreement with the Emperor […]

The Ostrogothic Conquest of Italy — Novo Scriptorium

Pantheon Columns, Rome — Ashtronort – History’s Mysteries

Santa Maria Rotunda / Piazza della Rotunda Located in front of the Pantheon is a pedestrian square called the “Piazza della Rotunda”. The square is home to several open air cafes & restaurants which cater to the swarms of tourists who flock to Rome each year to visit the historic buildings and ruins that lay […]

Pantheon Columns, Rome — Ashtronort – History’s Mysteries