Zodiac killer

Thursday, 1 April 2021

Elamite seal. Iran. From „The Elamite Cylinder Seal Corpus, c. 3500–1000 BC“ by Karen Jane Gardon.

Soooo What’s this all about?

Top row:

Autumn (symbolised by a lion) follows summer (symbolised by a bull)…This is the moment in time that this seal marks. This is why we have a lion chasing bull and  the cross in the upper panel…I talked about the symbols of the seasons in this post

So what about the bottom row with two bulls facing each other? 

Based on the horn shape and no hump, these are bulls of the Eurasian wild cattle, aurochs…

Beginning of August, the end of summer, beginning of autumn, is also when Eurasian wild cattle, aurochs used to mate…During this time auroch bulls fought (faced) each other for females…I talked about the reproductive cycle of aurochs in my post „Ram and bull„….

read more:http://oldeuropeanculture.blogspot.com/2021/04/zodiac-killer.html

Bull-Lion

Saturday, 19 December 2020

 

This is truly incredible object. Composite Lion and Bull, bronze, Iran, 1500-1000 BC. It is currently kept in the Cleveland Art Museum. The meaning of this object is unknown. It is presumed that it has served as an object of worship in a temple or shrine…

Worship of who? Who else. The beast of course. 

The beast in this case is The Sun during hot, dry season, which in Mesopotamia starts at the beginning of May, beginning of summer and ends at the end of October, the end of autumn.

The hot, dry season spans summer (symbolised by bull) and autumn (symbolised by lion). 

I talked about the animal symbols of the seasons and why these particular animals were chosen to be the symbols of the seasons in my article „Symbols of seasons

The dry season in Mesopotamia is the season of drought and death…Completely dominated by the blazing summer and autumn sun….The god of death: Nergal…The Late Summer Sun was equated with the God of Death, Mot, in Levant too. 

 

read more: http://oldeuropeanculture.blogspot.com/2020/12/bull-lion.html

Assur

Tuesday, 15 December 2020

This was part of a wall relief was found inside a well within the courtyard of the temple of Assur at the city of Ashur, the capital city of the Assyrians…Gypsum. First half of the second millennium BCE. The Pergamon Museum, Berlin.
 
 

The central part of the relief depicts a male deity. He holds two long branches, and two ibex goats (standing on their hind legs) appear to eat from these branches. Two other identical branches seem to grow out the bottom half of his body…

Two smaller figures, identified as female deities, stand on each of his sides, holding two jars from which water flows out…

Official interpretation: Probably this bearded deity represents the god Assur, while the goddesses protect the plant and animal world in this city…I would not agree with this entirely…

I kind of agree with the main deity being identified as Assur. One of his epithets was „šadû rabû“ (great mountain) and if we look at his skirt, kilt, we can see that it is „decorated“ with the same design that Sumerians and Akkadians used to depict mountains…

The great mountain is not any one mountain in particular. It is the collective name for the northern mountains and highlands of Eastern Turkey, where we find the source of both Tigris and Euphrates…

The climatic year in this part of the world is divided into wet, cool season (Nov-Apr) and dry, hot season (May-Oct). 

The start of the wet season coincides with the start of the Ibex mating season characterised by fighting upright. Ibex is used here as a calendar marker…

The rain brought by the „dancing“ ibexes, revives the nature and makes everything in the lowlands green again after months of scorching heat and drought…Hence green branches growing out of the god’s body and held by the god. Munched by the ibexes…

This rain also feeds the two rivers, which are depicted by the two small „goddesses“ with jars overflowing in two flows. In Sumerian art this jar with two flows was always used to symbolise the two rivers, Tigris and Euphrates…

 

read more: http://oldeuropeanculture.blogspot.com/2020/12/assur.html

Aeon – The Personification of the Zodiac — Ancient-Mystery.com

Aeon is the Hellenistic deity of time, the orb or circle surrounding the universe. This god or aeon is personification of the zodiac itself. As you will see Aeon is an important god when studying the ancient Greek myths and legends. Here at Ancient Mystery there is always more behind the veil… The post Aeon…

Aeon – The Personification of the Zodiac — Ancient-Mystery.com

Unicorn

Monday, 7 September 2020

Unicorn, 13th c. floor mosaic, Basilica of San Giovanni Evangelista, Ravenna

While we are talking about unicorns, I actually believe that unicorns (horses with a single giant „horn“) do exist…Except their horns are depicted in the wrong place…Probably because of the morals 🙂

The predecessor of all medieval bestiaries, Physiologus (Φυσιολόγος), which was compiled in Alexandria sometime between 2nd-4th c. AD, popularised an elaborate allegory about a unicorn trapped by a maiden (representing the Virgin Mary)

„As soon as the unicorn sees the virgin, it lays its head on her lap and falls asleep“ it claims…

What does this mean?

Well I believe that this is another myth which has its root in the „natural zodiac“, set of symbols based on fixed annual lifecycle events…

In this case the unicorn symbol is derived from the natural reproductive cycle of horses.

The natural breeding season of horses typically begins around mid-April and finishes around mid September…It is characterised by violent stallion fights…

The beginning of the horse mating season coincided with the beginning of the sailing season in the Eastern Mediterranean, which is probably why the Greek sea god Poseidon to whom then sailors prayed for calm seas, was also „god of horses“ who was „worshiped as a stallion“. You can read more about this in my post „Trojan horse„..

read more: http://oldeuropeanculture.blogspot.com/2020/09/unicorn.html

Sunday, 14 June 2020

Scorpion man

 
Official description of this seal: „During Middle Assyrian period, seal carvers expanded their repertoire of fantastic and mythical creatures. On this seal, a bird-man with a scorpion tail aims a bow and arrow at a winged lion-griffin standing on a hillock“. 1400-1200BC.

I have to say I love this description. It says that officially we have no idea what this all means…

So let’s try to make some sense out of this scene…

Scorpion men appear in the Epic of Gilgamesh, where they stand guard outside the gates of the sun god Shamash at the mountains of Mashu. These give entrance to Kurnugi, the land of darkness…

Now when we talk about the sun god and the land of darkness that usually means winter. Which in Mesopotamia climatically starts at the beginning of November. In Scorpio…When the first rains arrive…And the temperature drops…

 
I talked about this in my post „Queen Puabi’s cylinder seal„…

But before people start complaining about precession and constellations and such stuff, I am not talking about stars at all. Or stellar zodiac. I am talking about solar year markers…

The scorpio I am talking about marks the time when temperature in the northern hemisphere falls below what scorpions consider nice. And they decide to retire. Underground or inside people’s houses. Where it’s warm…

Das Gastmahl der Sterne

Gastmahl der Sterne

Leonardo Da Vinci’s Werk `Das Abendmahl´ steckt voller Rätsel. In dem Bild, das er im Refektorium des Dominikanerklosters Santa Maria delle Grazie in Mailand malte, zeigt er den Augenblick des Verrates während der letzten Zusammenkunft der Apostel mit Jesus. Ihre ausdrucksvollen Gesten vermitteln dem Betrachter eine scheinbar authentische Atmosphäre des Geschehens. Doch hinter der malerischen Erzählung verbirgt sich eine Komposition, die nicht nur die pythagoreische Zahlensymbolik, sondern auch das Jahrtausende alte astrologische Wissen widerspiegelt. Damit ist das Werk auch ein einzigartiges Bekenntnis für die Gedanken des von Leonardo geschätzten römischen Dichters und Philosophen Lukrez.

Ab 20. April bei Tredition/Amazon u.a,

 

 

 

Symbols of the seasons

If we look at the zodiac circle, we can see that each of the seasons either starts or ends with a sign representing a large animal:
Spring ends with Aries (ram). In my post „Ram and Bull“ I explained that the ram symbol marks the end of the lambing season of the wild Eurasian sheep in Europe.
Summer starts in Taurus (bull). In my post „Ram and Bull“ I explained that the bull symbol marks the beginning of the calving season of the wild Eurasian cattle in Europe.

Four living creatures

Monday, 15 April 2019

This is quarter shekel from the British Museum. Struck before 333 BCE, it is considered to be the first Jewish coin. Following the description in Ezekiel of the flying throne of Yahveh with wheels and wings, the image is interpreted as the representation of Yahveh, The God…

Ezekiel is a Hebrew prophet and the central protagonist of the Book of Ezekiel in the Hebrew Bible, which reveals prophecies regarding the destruction of Jerusalem and the first temple.

The author of the Book of Ezekiel presents himself as Ezekiel, the son of Buzzi, born into a priestly (Kohen) lineage. Apart from identifying himself, the author gives a date for the first divine encounter which he presents: „in the thirtieth year“. If this is a reference to Ezekiel’s age at the time, he was born around 622 BCE, about the time of Josiah’s reforms. His „thirtieth year“ is given as five years after the exile of Judah’s king Jehoiachin by the Babylonians, which according to Josephus happened in 598 BCE.

The vision Ezekiel had „in his thirtieth year“ and which turned him into a prophet was of Jahveh sitting on the throne carried by the „four living creatures“.

As I looked, a stormy wind came out of the north: a great cloud with brightness around it and fire flashing forth continually, and in the middle of the fire, something like gleaming amber. In the middle of it was something like four living creatures. This was their appearance: they were of human form. Each had four faces, and each of them had four wings…As for the appearance of their faces: the four had the face of a human being, the face of a lion on the right side, the face of an ox on the left side, and the face of an eagle; such were their faces…

The Zodiacal Riddle of Vettius Valens — The Classical Astrologer

Zitat

The works of major Hellenistic astrologers have become available over the last few decades. Of course, Claudius Ptolemy has been part of the canon for centuries. His works have been helpful in many ways, but we can’t say he is the last word. Indeed, the reading of Ptolemy has lead to many preconceptions, particularly with […]

über The Zodiacal Riddle of Vettius Valens — The Classical Astrologer